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Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in a multicultural inflammatory bowel disease cohort
  1. Sukhdev Chatu,
  2. Vivek Chhaya,
  3. Rosamund Holmes,
  4. Penny Neild,
  5. Jin-Yong Kang,
  6. Richard C Pollok,
  7. Andrew Poullis
  1. Department of Gastroenterology, St George's University Hospital, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Andrew Poullis, Department of Gastroenterology, St George's University Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT, UK; apoullis{at}sgul.ac.uk

Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a multicultural inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cohort and determine predictors of deficiency including ethnicity.

Design Patients with IBD were recruited into a dedicated database over a 6-month period and evaluated retrospectively.

Setting Department of Gastroenterology, St George's University Hospital, London, UK.

Outcomes measured Clinical data including demographics, ethnic group, disease phenotype by the Montreal classification, vitamin D level and season tested were recorded from clinical and electronic medical records. Vitamin D levels were classified as normal (≥50 nmol/l) and deficient (<50 nmol/l).

Results 168 patients had a vitamin D level measured subsequent to diagnosis. There was no significant difference in the median vitamin D level between patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) (39 nmol/l (IQR 23–56) vs 28 nmol/l (IQR 17–51), p=0.35). Overall the median vitamin D level was significantly lower in non-Caucasians (Asian and Black) versus Caucasians (28 nmol/l (IQR 17–41) vs 41 nmol/l (IQR 25–63), p<0.0001). Multiple regression analysis revealed IBD related surgery (OR 2.9) and ethnicity (OR 6.0 non-Caucasian vs Caucasian) in CD and ethnicity (OR 5.0 non-Caucasian vs Caucasian) in UC were independently associated with vitamin D deficiency.

Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is common in IBD patients; therefore, we suggest monitoring of vitamin D levels and correction with supplements especially in non-Caucasians and those with a history of IBD related surgery.

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