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Endoscopy and implantable electronic devices
  1. G D Corbett1,
  2. P C Buttery2,
  3. P J Pugh3,
  4. E A B Cameron1
  1. 1Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK
  2. 2Department of Neurology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK
  3. 3Department of Cardiology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ewen Cameron, Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Box 293, Endoscopy Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK; ewen.cameron{at}addenbrookes.nhs.uk

Abstract

The increasing use of implantable electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers and neurostimulators means that they are being increasingly encountered in endoscopy departments. The electromagnetic fields generated during electrosurgery and with magnetic imaging systems have the potential to interfere with such devices. The authors present a case that highlights some of the steps necessary for minimising risk, review the evidence and summarise the currently available guidance.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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