Article Text

PDF
Opinion
Rifaximin treatment for encephalopathy reduces hospital resource use: real-world data don’t fail to IMPRESS
  1. John D Ryan,
  2. Emmanuel A Tsochatzis
  1. Sheila Sherlock Liver Unit and UCL Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, Royal Free Hospital and UCL, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Emmanuel A Tsochatzis, Sheila Sherlock Liver Unit and UCL Institute of Liver and Digestive Health, Royal Free Hospital and UCL, Pond Street, NW3 2QG, London, UK; e.tsochatzis{at}ucl.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

The adventof rifaximin, a poorly absorbed antibiotic, for recurrent hepatic encephalopathy (HE) represents a major therapeutical advance for a debilitating condition, the treatment of which had remained unchanged for more than 30 years. The development of HE represents decompensation of end-stage liver disease and is a marker of poor prognosis.1 Recurrent HE significantly reduces health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and is an indication for liver transplantation. A seminal randomised placebo-controlled study, which was published in 2010, demonstrated the efficacy of rifaximin in the secondary prevention of HE (60% reduction) as well as in the prevention of hospital admissions (50% reduction).2

Several studies have …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles